Taming of the shrew kate monologue. 6 Petruchio Shakespeare Monologues 2019-01-14

Taming of the shrew kate monologue Rating: 5,2/10 1364 reviews

Shakespeare — Taming of the Shrew monologue

taming of the shrew kate monologue

Kate like the hazel-twig Is straight and slender, and as brown in hue As hazel-nuts, and sweeter than the kernels. And toward the education of your daughters I here bestow a simple instrument, And this small packet of Greek and Latin books. Go, fool, and whom thou keep'st command. By asking Kate to go get the other women, Petruchio gives her an opportunity to lord over the others. Nonetheless, Shakespeare went farther than any dramatist before his time in approaching comedy with tongue firmly in cheek. So I to her, and so she yields to me; For I am rough, and woo not like a babe. In the play's final scene, the assembled company enjoys a banquet in Lucentio's home.

Next

No Fear Shakespeare: The Taming of the Shrew: Act 5 Scene 2

taming of the shrew kate monologue

Lord - Sirrah, go you to Barthol'mew my page, And see him dress'd in all suits like a lady; That done, conduct him to the drunkard's chamber, And call him 'madam,' do him obeisance. Come, come, you weak, ungovernable worms! Of all thy suitors here I charge thee tell Whom thou lov'st best. You are too blunt; go to it orderly. But what has really happened is that Tranio has taken on Lucentio's identity so that Tranio can negotiate a marriage settlement for his master based upon acting under his disguise. We know Baptista doesn't know the first thing about his girls — he thinks Bianca is an angel for Pete's sake — so let's not take his word for it.

Next

The Taming of the Shrew Act V Summary and Analysis

taming of the shrew kate monologue

Does this mean Kate is opposed to marriage altogether? Provide the feast, father, and bid the guests; I will be sure my Katherine shall be fine. Asses are made to bear, and so are you. Finally, facility with language is considered a masculine trait, and for Kate to exhibit such linguistic aptitude suggests that she has not totally abandoned her masculine ways. She readily agrees with Petruchio, quite respectfully and subserviently, in fact. Neighbour, this is a gift very grateful, I am sure of it.

Next

Taming of the Shrew, Act II, Scene 1 :

taming of the shrew kate monologue

Nay, then good-night our part! I prithee, sister Kate, untie my hands. What, is the jay more precious than the lark Because his feathers are more beautiful? You are so old and gross to start, therefore it won't be hard to part. I must ensure his last breath on this earth, I shall slip poison into his next meal? O, let me see thee walk. Why, then the maid is mine from all the world By your firm promise; Gremio is out-vied. They must study the approach of each of the tamers by deciding whether their approach is physical or psychological, honest or deceitful.

Next

Katherine Minola in The Taming of the Shrew

taming of the shrew kate monologue

Nay, I have off'red all; I have no more; And she can have no more than all I have; 1235 If you like me, she shall have me and mine. Tranio - Mi perdonato, gentle master mine; I am in all affected as yourself; Glad that you thus continue your resolve To suck the sweets of sweet philosophy. Many of her expressions are hyperbolic, not unlike much of the rhetoric Petruchio used earlier on her. Tranio and call for an officer, claiming that Vincentio is mad, and the controversy rages until Lucentio and Bianca return from their hasty wedding. Hortensio takes up the challenge next, and after Bianca's refusal to appear, we are not at all surprised to find the Widow will not come when beckoned. Your husband is your lord, your life, your keeper, your head, your sovereign, one who cares for you and who, for your ease and comfort, commits his body to harsh labor both on land and sea. K, and Ephraim The life we live is not that great I sit at home and I just wait For you to come with food so late My love's not real its full of hate You look at me and I feel sad True love is what we do not have The things you do to me are bad I do not like you stupid lad If you leave then ill be glad You are the one who makes me mad Elsa, Pascale, Sophie, Kate, and Claire Z.

Next

The Taming of the Shrew; Is Kate Tamed?

taming of the shrew kate monologue

O no, good Kate; neither art thou the worse For this poor furniture and mean array. Why did she marry Hortensio, then? Never make denial; 1130 I must and will have Katherine to my wife. Why are our bodies soft and weak and smooth, unfit for toil and trouble in the world, if not so that our soft qualities and our hearts should agree with our external parts? A woman owes her husband the same loyalty a subject owes his king. Overcoming her shrewishness, according to this idea, is a triumph for Kate because it allows her to be happy. Seeing that their game is finally up, Tranio, the Pedant, and Biondello all scatter away. An angry woman is like an agitated fountain—muddy, unpleasant, lacking in beauty.

Next

No Fear Shakespeare: The Taming of the Shrew: Act 5 Scene 2

taming of the shrew kate monologue

By showing her self-control during that moment, instead of having an outburst, it is obvious that Kate outsmarted Petruchio. Petruchio - Thus have I politicly begun my reign, And 'tis my hope to end successfully. I'm sure we can work out a deal. Well, to start, the first time Kate speaks or shouts in the play is when she objects to her father's behavior when he breaks the news that Bianca can't get married. O, put me in thy books! By report I know him well. Such duty as the subject owes the prince, Even such a woman oweth to her husband; And when she is froward, peevish, sullen, sour, And not obedient to his honest will, What is she but a foul contending rebel And graceless traitor to her loving lord? She is not, at all, tamed; simply able to get the things she wants in a calmer manner.

Next

the taming of the shrew Flashcards

taming of the shrew kate monologue

Nay, come again, Good Kate; I am a gentleman. He that knows better how to tame a shrew, Now let him speak; 'tis charity to show. One of the first clues that Shakespeare intends Kate's speech not be taken literally is that the soliloquy comes in the context of an entertainment. The notion of husbands betting on their wives, in fact, is laughable and adds an air of merriment to the feast. Petruchio - No, not a whit; I find you passing gentle. But now, Baptista, to your younger daughter: Now is the day we long have looked for; 1185 I am your neighbour, and was suitor first. Too light for such a swain as you to catch; And yet as heavy as my weight should be.


Next